Dementia-Capable Napa County

Hear the Radio Announcement on 
KVON 1440 AM Radio

Grant Announcement: Short News Story

by Celine Regalia, Jill Wood

KVON Full Interview

by Celine Regalia, Jill Wood, Maureen Book

Read About it in the
>Napa Valley Register<

Project Advisory Partners

Napa Commission on Aging
Napa/Solano Area Agency on Aging
Live Healthy Napa County
Healthy Minds Healthy Aging
Healthy Aging Population Initiative
Queen of the Valley Medical Center.

Project Supported By

Alzheimer’s Association of
Northern California & Northern Nevada

Napa / Solano Area Agency on Aging

Napa County
Health & Human Services Agency
Public Health Division

Napa County
Health & Human Services Agency
Comprehensive Services for Older Adults

Healthy Aging Population Initiative

Mentis

Congressman Mike Thompson

Queen of the Valley Foundation

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON
Dementia-Capable Napa County
Contact:

Jill Wood, MSW

707.258.9080
jwood@collabriacare.org

Collabria Care Is Awarded $1 Million Grant to Implement Dementia-Capable Napa County

Collabria Care is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a $1 million grant to implement an innovative project called Dementia-Capable Napa County.

With the implementation of Dementia-Capable Napa County, Napa County will become a community in which people living with dementia and their families are empowered, included, and respected, and have access to supportive expert resources so they can live their best possible lives.

“Napa County is the perfect place to utilize the Dementia-Capable model,” says Celine Regalia, Collabria Care’s Executive Director. “With the number of Napa County seniors living with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias estimated to increase by 36% over the next six years, our Day Program has developed and increased its services and expertise to address it. Almost 70% of our participants now have a form of dementia. It used to be 25%.”

Since 1999, Collabria Care has been Napa County’s designated Alzheimer’s Day Care Resource Center. More recently, it has implemented a cutting-edge person-centered care model, which has had a dramatic impact on program participants by preserving their dignity and lowering rates of depression and social isolation while focusing on their quality of life. By avoiding premature nursing home placement, visits to the ER, and hospitalizations, Collabria Care has helped to lower the financial and emotional strain on families.

Dementia-Capable Napa County will allow Collabria Care to broaden these services and further create a positive and respectful environment for those living with Alzheimer’s and related dementias.

The grant, which has been awarded by the Alzheimer’s Disease Programs Initiative – Grants to States and Communities, Administration on Aging, Administration for Community at the US Department of Health and Human Services, will extend our reach in our community by:

  • Identifying people living with Alzheimer’s disease or other related dementias (ADRD) in Napa County, many of whom live alone, and ensure they receive appropriate services
  • Supporting family members with the tools they need to manage difficult behaviors and conditions that accompany ADRD
  • Providing training for first responders, community leaders, members of the faith-based community, and others who have frequent contact with people with ADRD, so they have the tools and strategies to identify them and make the appropriate referrals
  • Collaborate with and support the staff of Queen of the Valley Medical Center in becoming a dementia-capable hospital

Collabria Care will work closely with local community agencies who are committed to this project including Napa Commission on Aging, Napa/Solano Area Agency on Aging, Live Healthy Napa County, Healthy Minds Healthy Aging, Healthy Aging Population Initiative, and Queen of the Valley Medical Center.

At the end of the 3-year project, Collabria Care will create a manual and serve as a consultant to other communities on how to become Dementia Capable.

Ken & Judy’s Story:
Abiding Love through Great Adversity

Produced by eMotion studios, Sausalito. https://emotionstudios.com/

                                                                Book Learning

              Steve and Maureen Book 
             Learn 
to Live with Alzheimer’s

When they lived in Piedmont, CA, Steve and Maureen Book had all the appearances of living a charmed life. Steve, a talented software engineer and Maureen, a hospice nurse, were energetic, vivacious, talented and engaged with their family and community. Both enjoyed swimming; Steve would do long-distance bicycle rides with his kids; then there was soccer, baseball and helping his son earn an Eagle Scout. Steve, a born romantic, often wrote beautiful poetry to surprise his wife, and his irrepressible sense of humor was never far from view.

But as he approached the end of his 50s, Steve began to forget things—big things, not just car keys or where he left a cup of coffee. By the time they moved to the Napa Valley, there had been significant memory loss, and he had been diagnosed with Early-Onset Alzheimer’s disease.

Being proactive, Maureen made an appointment with him for a memory screening at Collabria Care, a precursor to participating in the Mind Boosters program. “I was unable to test him” said Jill Wood, MSW, Director of the Collabria Day Program. “His memory loss had already progressed past the point where Mind Boosters could be helpful.” However, he was eligible for and was admitted to the Collabria Day Program.

Launched as Adult Day Health Services in 1998, the Collabria Day Program offers the frail elderly, younger disabled, and those with Alzheimer’s Disease and dementia, dignity, connection, and independence; keeps them active and engaged; helps avoid Emergency Department visits and hospital admissions; and prevents premature placements in a skilled nursing homes. The program also provides much-needed respite to our participants’ families. Using a refined person-centered care model, the program is specifically tailored to each participant and encourages them to engage in activities and occupations that are familiar, rewarding and engaging which fosters socialization and creativity.

When our Day Program Staff discovered that Steve was a stellar, competitive ping-pong player, they put the word out that they were looking for table and one was donated.  He played for hours, giving the staff and other participants a very good workout! Though he remains physically fit, his hand-eye coordination has lessened with the progression of the disease and he is no longer able to play.  Now, he enjoys walking in our garden and often spends mornings exploring the infinity path and examining the flowers. Being a solutions-oriented guy, he sometimes sits at the computers with our social workers as if to assist them with their workload and he helps the staff clear up after lunch, cleans the iPads used in many of the Day Program activities.

For Maureen, the Day Program was a godsend. As anyone who has cared for a person with dementia knows, the stress is extreme and unrelenting, and it takes a toll on the caregiver’s health and emotional wellbeing. “It’s the peace of mind,” said Maureen, “knowing that your loved one is being cared for with dignity, kindness, and respect.” Recently, Maureen has had to make the honorable but difficult decision to place Steve into full-time care. “When I sat Steve down to tell him I could no longer look after him at home, I wept with emotion. He comforted me and whispered, ‘We go on.’ Then we wept together.”

Worried that he would have to leave the Day Program where he is happy, and content, Jill was able to offer relief in the form of a scholarship, so he could continue to avail of the Day Program’s benefits as he transitioned into his new dwelling.

Shortly thereafter, Jill received a handwritten note from Maureen.
“I was listening to Nora Jones the other day and a song came on the radio, ‘Can We Begin Again?’ How many times does your staff have to re-think, redo, change the direction a patient is heading, lift-up, hold tight, laugh, listen to heartstrings even though words don’t make sense? Resilience, collaboration, and joy are some of the ingredients that penetrate Steve’s Collabria home.

This is a gift your staff has given us since Steve has been ‘playing with you guys.’ Thinking Steve would have to move now would break my heart! The financial support you’ve given us will make the next few months easier…”

We’re honored to be able to care for dozens of families like Steve and Maureen’s at Collabria Care. Through Dementia-Capable Napa Valley we will be able to extend our services like the critical memory screening Steve received as well as family consultations and resource referrals to the broader Napa County community.

The Pattersons
Addressing Alzheimer’s as a Family

 

To care for one parent with dementia was difficult; dealing with two was overwhelming until they found Collabria Care